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Beverly Heritage Days: Centuries of History

Featuring the Battle of Rich Mountain Reenactment
July 14, 15, 16, 2017
Beverly and Rich Mountain, West Virginia

Experience the timeline of history with camps, demonstrations, and living history from Frontier period to World War II all day Saturday and Sunday morning, with a reenactment of the pivotal Civil War Battle of Rich Mountain on Sunday afternoon. Activities will include heritage inspired music, a multi-period fashion show, Time Travel Dance, and children’s games and activities. Food available will include pork BBQ lunch and homemade pie sale.

See detailed Event Schedule 
See Feature: Living History at Beverly Heritage Days
See Feature: The Music of Beverly Heritage Days
See Feature: Fashions at Beverly Heritage Days

Reenactors, living historians, musicians who wish to participate, see HERE

Beverly Heritage Days 2017

Detailed Schedule Released:

Or see PDF complete with maps HERE

Friday, July 14
7:30 pm      Blue and Gray Community Choir -- Beverly Presbyterian Church

Saturday, July 15
10 am – 5 pm  FRONTIER, CIVIL WAR, AND WORLD WAR II CAMPS OPEN (Beverly)
10 – 10:45    Falling Branch Band (Traditional Music) -- Goff Back Porch, Bev.
10:15         Civil War Cannon Demonstration -- Jail Back Yard (CW Camp), Bev.
10:30 – 12    Timeline Fashion Show -- IOOF upstairs, Beverly
10:45–11:30   Potluck Jug Band (Jug Band Favorites) -- Goff Back Porch, Beverly
11 until gone BBQ lunch -- BHC yard, Beverly
11:30 – 12:15 Gerry Milnes (West Virginia Fiddle Music) -- Goff Back Porch, Bev.
Noon til gone Pie Sale Goff -- Front Porch, Beverly
11:45         Machine Gun Demonstration -- Logan Yard (WW II Camp), Beverly
12:15—1       Push to Start (19th Century Music & Song) -- Goff Back Porch, Bev.
12:30         Civil War Cannon Demonstration -- Jail Back Yard (CW Camp)
1 – 3         Interpretive Battlefield Tours -- Battlefield top of Rich Mtn.
1 – 3         Civil War Living History  -- Field of Fire Pavilion Rich Mtn.
1:00          Marstiller Grave Ceremony -- Beverly Cemetery
1 – 1:45      Michael & Carrie Kline (Timeless Songs) -- Goff Back Porch, Bev.
1:45–2:30     Jamie Brackman (Singer-Songwriter) -- Goff Back Porch, Beverly
2:00          Pierpont Program -- Beverly Heritage Center (Courthouse)
2:30—3:15     Ken Sheller (Hammered Dulcimer Music) -- Goff Back Porch, Beverly
2:45          Civil War Cannon Demonstration -- Jail Back Yard (CW Camp), Bev.
3:15—4        Peter Baxter (Civil War Songs) -- Goff Back Porch, Beverly
3:30          Machine Gun Demonstration -- Logan Yard (WW II Camp), Beverly
3:30          Drill and Safety Inspection -- Camp Garnett field at Rich Mountain
4:30          Skirmish -- Camp Garnett field at Rich Mountain
7:30—9:30     TIME TRAVEL DANCE -- IOOF upstairs, Beverly

Sunday July 16
10 - 1      CAMPS OPEN IN BEVERLY AND RICH MOUNTAIN
10 am       Civil War Church Service -- Beverly Presbyterian Church
10:45–11:30 Senior Moments (Mountain Swing Music) -- Goff Back Porch, Beverly
11 am Civil War Cannon Demonstration -- Jail Back Yard (CW Camp), Beverly
11:30–12:15 Don Olson (Swing and Jazz Music) -- Goff Back Porch, Beverly
Noon        Machine Gun Demonstration -- Logan Yard (WW II Camp), Beverly
12:15–1:00  Sound of the Mountains (Old Time Tunes) -- Goff Back Porch, Beverly
12:30       Drill and Safety Inspection -- Camp Garnett field - Rich Mountain
1:30        Rich Mountain Memorial Ceremony -- Camp Garnett field - Rich Mtn.
2:00        BATTLE OF RICH MOUNTAIN REENACTMENT -- Camp Garnett Field

Living History Through the Centuries at Beverly Heritage Days

By Christopher Taylor

It’s dusk, the end of a long day. Men of the Augusta County Militia are camped near the waters of the Tygart Valley River. A campfire is blazing, even in July. It isn’t cold, but they need a cooking fire nonetheless. The year is not 1790. It’s 2017, and this is Beverly Heritage Days: Centuries of History. The Pioneer Camp is just one of the living history camps throughout town, celebrating a timeline of history spanning 1750 to 1950.

For Beverly resident and reenactor Karl Mulac, living history helps him to better understand the region in which he lives. “In 2007 when I moved here from Illinois, I began to focus on settlement west of the Allegheny Mountains, specifically Randolph County,” he explained. “It is my goal to better understand all aspects of settlement: why they came, the trails they took.” He has been involved in living history since the mid 1990s.

Mulac portrays one of his wife’s ancestors— Col. Sampson Matthews of the Augusta County Militia. From 1772 until the 1790s, militia traveled a circuit of forts between Staunton, VA and Buckhannon to aid settlers in fortification and provide information on Native American activity. “I find history and the research as equally fascinating as any fiction I have read,” Mulac said. “This provides me with a context to base my clothing, equipment, and even skill sets that I develop for presentation at events.”

OOne of the most rewarding things about living history is the passing of information on to others. “Many of the pioneers’ descendants still live in Randolph County and do not know their own heritage,” Mulac explained. “But then comes the look on someone’s face when they hear their last name mentioned from an early settler in the 1800s. The cell phone goes down and the attention goes up. It’s priceless!”
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An understanding of our shared heritage also helps to illuminate our present. “There is one thing that stands out the most—a trait that I still see in many West Virginians,” Mulac added. “The sense of community was crucial to survival. Building the forts in the Tygart’s Valley was a community effort. When danger was near they would rush to the fort to embrace safety in numbers until the danger has passed. The community of settlers was widespread but came together when needed. This remains today as a strength of West Virginia. Last year, floods ravaged many communities, but when the need arises the greater community of West Virginia steps up to support those in need. The history we live through shows both failures and triumphs.”br />
Living history from the Pioneer, Civil War, and World War II periods will be offered all weekend throughout the town of Beverly. A Civil War doctor and cannon demonstrations will be stationed behind the 1841 Randolph County Jail. The World War II camps will feature American GI and German impressions along with displays, vehicles, and a machine gun demonstration. Visitors are invited to live music, a Timeline Fashion Show, and a Time Travel Dance to be held on Saturday. Visitors are also encouraged to check out the Civil War camp on Rich Mountain, where a skirmish is scheduled for 4:30pm on Saturday, and a reenactment of the 1861 Battle of Rich Mountain will wrap up the weekend at 2:00pm on Sunday afternoon. All activities are free and open to the public.

“By remembering were we come from, I hope we continue to hold on to what makes us strong and change what makes us weak,” Mulac concluded.

Beverly Heritage Days will be held on July 14, 15, and 16 with many events representing Centuries of History. For more information, contact the Beverly Heritage Center at (304) 637-7424 or email info@beverlyheritagecenter.org.

      


Timeline of Music at Beverly Heritage Days

By Christopher Taylor

Walt Whitman once wrote: “I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear.” Soon Beverly will be singing and that variety will be showcased in numerous live music offerings during Beverly Heritage Days: Centuries of History on July 14, 15, and 16. The varied musical selections will correspond with the timeline theme of the event.

“The musical groups represent a timeline of American heritage music,” explains Les Caraher, organizer of music for the event and accomplished banjo player. “The timeline will range from traditional Appalachian, to Civil War era, to swing and jug band music from the 1920s, and singer/songwriter music of today,” he said.

Caraher shared how music was brought into the region by early settlers in the 18th and 19th centuries: “They eventually developed their own unique style on fiddle and banjo, mostly in isolation.” Popular music in the 19th century then built on those traditions. “Heart and minstrel songs were sung in family parlors and played on stage before the Civil War,” he said. “Then came ragtime and blues music, beginning in the 1880s and popular in the 20s and 30s. So much of contemporary American music reaches back to those earlier styles.”
Music begins Friday night at 7:30pm, with a concert performed by the Blue and Gray Choir at the Beverly Presbyterian Church. Songs will include African American spirituals, Stephen Foster standards, and Civil War era tunes.

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Saturday morning at 10am, live music will begin on the back porch of the Goff house. Gerry Milnes will play traditional fiddle music and share West Virginia folklore. Michael and Carrie Kline will sing traditional and contemporary folk songs. The Potluck Jug Band will perform music from the 1920s. Push to Start will feature bluegrass arrangements of Stephen Foster and Civil War songs. Falling Branch String Band will present traditional mountain music, and Ken Sheller will play the hammered dulcimer.

Saturday night at 7:30, a Time Travel Dance at the Beverly IOOF hall will feature live music provided by the Rich Mountain String Band. Attendees will learn the dance steps of the 18th, 19th, and early 20th century dances.

Music resumes on the Goff house back porch Sunday at 10am. The Senior Moments Mountain Swing Band will play tin pan alley and traditional fiddle tunes. Don Olson will share swing and jazz music on guitar and harmonica. Musical festivities conclude with Sound of the Mountains on hammered dulcimer, guitar, and bass.

“Our lineup represents a variety of musical styles which all developed during the golden age of American music,” Caraher said. “All of these musical styles and threads will be offered to the public during Beverly Heritage Days.”

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Don’t miss out on other activities throughout town. Living history camps representing Early Settlement, Civil War, and World War II periods will allow visitors to travel through time and history in a short walk around Beverly. Children’s activities and photo opportunities are available in the town square.

Visitors are also encouraged to check out the Civil War camp on Rich Mountain, where a skirmish is scheduled for Saturday, and a reenactment of the Battle of Rich Mountain will wrap up the weekend on Sunday afternoon. All activities are free and open to the public.
Music will begin on Friday, July 14 at 7:30 pm with the Blue and Gray Choir concert at Beverly Presbyterian Church.

MuMusic will continue Saturday, July 15 from 10am to 5 pm, and Sunday, July 16, from 10am to 1 pm, on the Goff House back porch.


    

Timeline Fashion Show is
“Beverly Through the Ages”

By Christopher Taylor

Ever wondered how your ancestors dressed? As fashions come and go, they are soon forgotten—relegated to family photo albums and history books. But thanks to the magic of living history, the fashions of the past will live again during a Timeline Fashion Show to be held during Beverly Heritage Days on Saturday, July 15 at 10:30 am.

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“We will show how people dressed in many different periods, from the pioneer days through the World War II era,” explains Diane Tennant, organizer of the show. The fashion show corresponds to the theme of Beverly Heritage Days: Centuries of History. The weekend-long event will feature living history and reenactors representing a timeline spanning 1750 to 1950.

Changing times are reflected in the various fashions. “As women’s rights moved forward, they had more freedom and their clothing changed a lot,” said Tennant. “The Civil War changed everything. Suddenly the men were gone and women were making business decisions, nursing the sick, and so on. You saw this again during World War II. Women were working in the factories, working outside the home. The clothing changed as the times changed.” Tennant also explained how fashions were impacted by the Industrial Revolution, as mass production led to an increasing variety of styles.

Marion County reenactor Sylvia Hayhurst will serve as announcer for the show, describing each outfit and when it would have been worn. Both ladies’ and men’s fashions, civilian and military, will be represented.

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Now over 225 years old, the town of Beverly was incorporated in 1790 as the original county seat of Randolph County. From its beginnings as a frontier outpost to its key position as a crossroads community during the Civil War, Beverly remains an important historical resource in both the county and the state. The Fashion Show and other events planned for Heritage Days are meant to honor the rich past and timeline of history that unfolded there.
Beverly’s timeline will also be reflected in other activities throughout town. Living history camps representing Early Settlement, Civil War, and World War II periods will allow visitors to travel through time and history in a short walk around town. A Time Travel Dance to be held Saturday night will feature the music and dance steps of three centuries. Children’s activities and photo opportunities are available in the town square.

Visitors are also encouraged to check out the Civil War camp on Rich Mountain, where a skirmish is scheduled for Saturday, and a reenactment of the Battle of Rich Mountain will wrap up the weekend on Sunday afternoon. All activities are free and open to the public.

“This is Beverly through the ages,” Tennant said.

The Timeline Fashion Show will take place at the newly-restored IOOF building in Beverly, on Saturday, July 15 at 10:30 am.

Camp circle at Bevery Heritage Days 2016     

Campfire circle time travel at the 2016 event.

BEVERLY HERITAGE CENTER
PO Box 227 / 4 Court Street  -  Beverly, WV 26253
304-637-7424  - 
info@beverlyheritagecenter.org